Listing, delisting & action plans

Listing and delisting...

In resolution 1261 (2001) the Security Council decided on a listing process to identify perpetrators, who continue to recruit and use children as child soldiers. The perpetrators should be included in an annex of named parties in the Secretary-General’s Annual Report on Children and Armed Conflict.

The principle of “naming and shaming” has brought some success and has led to compliance of relevant actors in the past. This has been emphasized when in resolution 1882 (2009) the Security Council requested the Secretary-General to expand the scope of his annexes. Now parties who have a pattern of committing sexual violence against children and/or killing and maiming of children are recorded additionally. These violations have to be systematic, willful and intentional to fullfil the listing criteria.

Today this “list of shame” contains nearly 50 parties, of which 16 are persistent violators who have been on the list for at least five years. These perpetrators continue to recruit and use children as child soldiers and/or have a pattern of committing sexual violence against children and/or killing and maiming of children. These three - out of the six - grave violations serve as so-called "triggers" in the monitoring process to record parties on the shaming list. To get off the list, parties have to engage into time bound action plans with the United Nations.

... and action plans

In his annual report on Children and Armed Conflict the Secretary-General publishes a shaming list with names of country specific parties, which are identified as perpetrators. These perpetrators continue to recruit and use children as child soldiers and/or have a pattern of committing sexual violence against children and/or killing and maiming of children. These three - out of six - grave violations serve as trigger in the monitoring process to record parties on the shaming list.

The only way for the parties to get off this list is to enter into a dialogue with the United Nations. The overall purpose is to implement concrete and time bound action plans, which include a systematic verification to make sure that the violations have ceased. Parties involved are requested to provide explicit suggestions for reintegrating affected children into their communities.

The idea of action plans as a way of delisting mainly works best with parties that respect the role of the United Nations: these groups are likely to commit to action plans in order to get off the shaming list. Other persistent perpetrators agreed on action plans only in light of possible further sanctions.