Human Rights Commissioner Löning on World Humanitarian Day

Aug 20, 2012

Particular thanks to all humanitarian aid workers and volunteer donors

To mark World Humanitarian Day on 19 August, Markus Löning, the Federal Government Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid, today (18 August) issued the following statement in Berlin:

“Many people around the world, be they refugees fleeing the war in Syria or communities facing starvation in the Sahel zone, are in need and require our help. Germany is one of the leading donors. Every day our support saves lives and eases terrible suffering.

In addition to official funding, private donations in particular have a huge impact. On World Humanitarian Day, I want to thank all the many volunteer donors.

I would also like to express my gratitude to and respect for all aid workers across the world. Without them, neither the international organizations nor private charities could provide humanitarian assistance on the ground.

I hope we will all continue to show solidarity with people in need.”

World Humanitarian Day was introduced in 2008. 19 August is a memorial day for the victims of the attack on the UN office in Iraq. On that day we recognize the efforts of all aid workers worldwide, who work under the toughest conditions to save lives, often putting their own at risk.

In 2012 the Federal Foreign Office will make available an estimated 113 million euros for humanitarian relief, humanitarian mine clearance and disaster reduction. Regional focal points for the Federal Foreign Office’s humanitarian assistance in 2012 are Africa, Afghanistan, the Palestinian territories and, at present, Syria. The aid measures financed by Germany are implemented by international organizations such as the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) as well as by non governmental organizations (NGOs).

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Human Rights and International Law

Child Labor in Birma

Respect for and expansion of human rights is a central focus of the policies of the German Government. German human rights policy in international relations follows a clear obligation: protecting people from violations of their rights and basic freedoms.