General Assembly: Statement by Ambassador Thoms at the Intergovernmental Negotiations on Security Council reform

Apr 1, 2014

"Mr. Chairman,

I align myself with the statement delivered by Ambassador Patriota on behalf of the G4 countries.

Allow me to add brief remarks in my national capacity.

Today’s discussion again underscores the urgent need for real Security Council reform. The world of today is not that of 1945. It is also not that of 1963, the first and last time that the Council was reformed.

As we near the year 2015, it is high time to reflect the new realities. This calls for a real, structural reform - not a mere enlargement in the economy class with a little bit more leg-room for some.  

Clearly, the voices of the developing world must be better represented. The fact that there are no permanent members from Africa and Latin America is the most glaring example of the Council’s structural imbalance.

Germany’s position is clear: African states in particular must be represented in the permanent category. For us, this means permanent membership in line with the UN Charter, no so-called “special case construct” of dubious nature.

Mr. Chairman,

the Charter of the United Nations stipulates the criteria according to which Council members should be elected. In our view, this should also apply to new permanent members:

Art. 23 states that due regard should be paid, in the first instance to the contributions of Members to the maintenance of peace and security and to the other purposes of the Organization, and also to equitable geographical distribution. 

Against this background, we consider the G4 proposal as a balanced basis around which convergence could be achieved.

Thank you."

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General Assembly: Statement by Ambassador Thoms at the Intergovernmental Negotiations on Security Council reform

UN Security Council (Archive)

Reform of the United Nations

The United Nations is a product of its times: founded in the wake of the two disastrous world wars of the previous century. Its organs and modes of functioning reflect the political balances of power and peace-building moral concepts of that era.